The Truth about Lisa Olson’s Pregnancy Miracle Book

pregnancy miracle

When someone says “pregnancy miracle”, you surely are intrigued before purchasing. Does the author really know a miracle or is it just another book deceiving people? If it has techniques, allegedly, to become pregnant miraculously, does anyone prove it’s true or it’s just a baseless affirmation? Click here to visit the official website.

I wanted to convince myself about the truth before laying it all out. When there are claims on both ends – true and scam – you know it’s the time to research. As one who bought the book and actually read it, I was also intrigued – what do people say? Shortly: it’s not a scam, but maybe the way it’s presented is overreacting. It’s a helpful book, but not up to anyone’s expectations of getting an actual miracle (eg: conceive quickly, definite way to have a boy/girl, cure infertility overnight, etc.)

Allegedly a scam – what they say about it

  • Allegedly, the promotion of this book has a lot of marketing text, advertising text to get you into buying it.
  • Also, some people claim that there’s nothing certain, since the positive reviewers seem to testify to the same things.
  • It can’t be a miracle as long as the doctor doesn’t know about it.
  • Doesn’t get you pregnant / doesn’t give you a ‘real solution’ to your personal infertility problem.
  • Contains just some information from sources that are known, thus we are aware of the information Lisa Olson presents.
  • Has generic information about nutrition.
  • Doesn’t show off any miracle.
  • Is worse than the actual advertising is.
  • It’s a clear waste of money.
  • It’s of no use if you aren’t aware of Chinese traditional healing or acupuncture.

Now, about calling it a scam, we need to analyze what the word ‘miracle’ means. According to The Free Dictionary, miracle means mainly the following two things (source: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/miracle ):

  • “An event that appears inexplicable by the laws of nature and so is held to be supernatural in origin or an act of ”
  • “One that excites admiring awe; a wonderful or amazing event,act,person, or ”

The major disappointment could be caused by the fact that if the book can help some women to conceive, it won’t necessarily be inexplicable or supernatural, but might be regarded as a “wonderful event” or even as an “amazing event”. Society today has sky-high expectations when thinking about a pregnancy miracle: we usually think of something like saying 2-3 words or eating some herbs pregnancy will begin in just a few minutes. Well, that’s not actually how the human body works.

Also, if you truly conceive after dozens of methods failed and you spent years trying – you will see it as a “miracle” (I guess this is what Lisa Olson was considering when she called it ‘Pregnancy Miracle’).

Also, there are doctors who know more medical info, and doctors who know less. Just because hundreds or thousands of doctors never heard about Lisa Olson’s miracle method doesn’t mean it’s fake. It just means it hasn’t been medically recognized or acknowledge, or it wasn’t meeting certain medical legislation aspects in order to be implemented, recommended and accepted. Doctors can’t just recommend anything to their patients, because then they are responsible by law for every recommendation. Don’t take something as “real” or “scam” just based on 3 or 20 doctor opinions.

Busting the myth that says “Pregnancy Miracle is a scam”

Let’s be like the Myth Busters and prove the alleged “scam” the contrary – how it’s not a scam! Why not? Let’s take the accusations and prove them wrong.

Myth: Allegedly, the promotion of this book has a lot of marketing text, advertising text to get you into buying it.

Fact: Every book’s promoting text needs marketing. Without actually advertising something, talking about its positive aspects, you wouldn’t even be able to sell toilet paper. Once a book is written and published, its purpose is sales. That’s the fact! Otherwise, why would an author bother writing it in the first place? Take toothpaste, cars, everything you enjoy so much. Check their advertising texts. When you actually purchase these items, couldn’t you say things like “it doesn’t shine like in the video” or “it doesn’t do as good as they said” or “on the box it says the effect lasts for 8 hours, but it only lasted for 3 hours”? Promoting products often has exaggerations. That doesn’t render the product useless/scam!

Myth: Also, some people claim that there’s nothing certain, since the positive reviewers seem to testify to the same things.

Fact: The book certainly talks about methods you need to make sure you will become fertile, but naturally. It won’t give you any hocus pocus, or magic pills. No, the book doesn’t have a calendar to track your ovulation. The Pregnancy Miracle book talks a lot about the foods, vitamins, nutrients you get into your body. What’s the reason? Lisa Olson tries to teach you what to avoid so that you can make sure that your chances to getting pregnant increase. While it might not be the supreme solution, it helps many women. Yes, we could say it’s about holistic treatment, ancient Chinese methods, their traditional medicine. Also, acupuncture is obviously part of that (the book clearly talks about acupuncture to help you). Of course, as any other real book, this one also indicates you need to have sex at the right time (of course you do, otherwise how could you become pregnant?) – that is during ovulation.

Olson does present techniques – I needed to read the book twice to make sure I get the picture about all the techniques, at first it was just more details than my mind could comprehend. So, I don’t say it’s “wow” or the “best book”, but it definitely helped me and a few of my friends. it took a few weeks for me, for some friends a few months – but the result was getting pregnant! Was there someone who didn’t see any outcome, no pregnancy? Yes, there was – as I said, it’s no magic pill to work for anyone.

Myth: It can’t be a miracle as long as the doctor doesn’t know about it.

Fact: As mentioned before, doctors won’t risk recommending or mentioning things that are not in their medical terms and are not accepted nationwide as a medical solution, because it’s not legally acknowledged and accepted by the medical authorities. Also, remember: this is based on some Chinese techniques! That means unless you are in China, other countries’ doctors might not recommend this book ever.

Myth: Doesn’t get you pregnant / doesn’t give you a ‘real solution’ to your personal infertility problem.

Fact: As I said, for most of my friends, including myself, the book actually worked because once we followed all the techniques, it brought results. How about others? There are women who won’t get pregnant after these techniques. It’s not a “100% guarantee” to work for everyone. Why not? Stress, wrong nutrition – many things can cause you to remain without a solution. Most of the times I have seen it’s just stress. How can you help that, if the other person just remains freaked out, anxious and stressful? As long as they don’t give up on stress, these methods (or others) can’t really work.

Myth: Contains just some information from sources that are known, thus we are aware of the information Lisa Olson presents.

Fact: Just because some parts might be common with other books doesn’t mean Olson didn’t research before writing the information. How could you know if she didn’t have to spend some time reading through 20 books until something real came out? Then why not spare you from the same effort, and providing a resume of what was essential plus personal experience? Living in 2015, you can hardly find a book that was written “just like that”, without any sources or books to be used as references. So, just because this book has references too doesn’t mean it’s a scam. Indeed, some parts of it are commonsense or things you found out already if you ever dealt with infertility.

Myth: Has generic information about nutrition.

Fact: Olson provided real information and techniques. There is a good way to go about it and if you ever purchase the book, you will see that it’s not about nutrition only, and it has precise information, not just generics. As I mentioned, it’s like a catalogue of preparatory techniques and Chinese techniques to use in order to help you.

Myth: Is worse than the actual advertising is.

Fact: Yes it is, just like my washing machine, my car, my smartphone, my tablet – almost every item I have and use. So what? Does that make them useless? No, it’s just that marketing texts are often exaggeratedly presenting reality, turning it into a super-reality, not entirely true.

Myth: It’s a clear waste of money.

Fact: Yes, maybe someone thinks so. Then, why did the author offer 60 days for money-back guarantee, no questions asked? Why was she certain about that? If she wants you to waste money, why didn’t she leave just 2-3 days for money-back guarantee? Even if you ever find it a waste of money – it will surely happen in less than 2 months, and then you will get a full refund.

Myth: It’s of no use if you aren’t aware of Chinese traditional healing or acupuncture.

Fact: Did anyone make you believe that as long as you don’t do something for yourself, it’s not possible? Acupuncture or other Chinese methods – you don’t need to know them, because there are experts who do. Simply contact them, schedule an appointment!

Conclusions

I see that many people aren’t happy, because they didn’t find an overnight solution, nor a magical pill. I am sorry to see the level of frustration spreading when women deal with infertility. Instead of crying about the lack of quick solutions, isn’t it better to try actual solutions and give them time? Why the rush? Having a baby is not like fast-food “I want that burger now”! Why do we act as if it was?

As one of the many women who bought this book, plus a review writer and researcher, I can say the Pregnancy Miracle book does work, but the marketing is obviously above the actual quality of the book. Still, I can’t regret the money I spent, and neither can one of my friends.

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